The Bell in the Woods

Once there was a wise old woman who found a bell in the woods and it was hanging from a tree.  She knew such a bell had to be important and so she respected it enough to take a seat and wait for someone else to come by and ring it.  And when it was rung by someone else, the man who rang it stood still as it rang inside and out.  The sound filled every space with the brilliance of the sun shining on every part of the sea.  And he fell to the ground with a smile on his face. 

She returned to the bell many years later when she knew her time had come.  She rang it so gracefully that the forest wept a gentle rain. And in an instant so powerful, it felt as if the universe had exploded and collapsed at the same time as she saw the entire life of this husk completed and was reunited with the light shed by the sound of the bell.

I wrote this fairy tale and 49 others in the course of two weeks last year. And I put together a schedule based on three categories that made sense to me after I had written them: order, chaos, and cosmic (a truer unity than order). Each week, I look at the list and post one. By now, I’ve forgotten the list’s order and so every week holds a bit of a self-induced surprise. This week, before consulting the list, I was walking in my neighborhood and heard the bell ring on the campus nearby. Due to the stay at home order in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the poem (within a passage included below) For Whom the Bell Tolls came instantly to mind. Two days later, I looked up my story list and it was none other than this one! In the last week, I’ve had nothing but tears for all the stories I’ve heard in the news especially the diabetic ones because I share that affliction (and have suffered through near-fatal pneumonia once). And I hope the suffering only brings to light the strength of our compassion for others and ourselves.

Here is John Donne’s larger section of the meditation (XVII) from which the well known poem is derived (in the public domain from www.gutenberg.org):

Who casts not up his eye to the sun when it rises? but who takes off his eye from a comet when that breaks out? Who bends not his ear to any bell which upon any occasion rings? but who can remove it from that bell which is passing a piece of himself out of this world? No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend’s or of thine own were: any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee. Neither can we call this a begging of misery, or a borrowing of misery, as though we were not miserable enough of ourselves, but must fetch in more from the next house, in taking upon us the misery of our neighbours. Truly it were an excusable covetousness if we did, for affliction is a treasure, and scarce any man hath enough of it. No man hath affliction enough that is not matured and ripened by it, and made fit for God by that affliction. If a man carry treasure in bullion, or in a wedge of gold, and have none coined into current money, his treasure will not defray him as he travels. Tribulation is treasure in the nature of it, but it is not current money in the use of it, except we get nearer and nearer our home, heaven, by it. Another man may be sick too, and sick to death, and this affliction may lie in his bowels, as gold in a mine, and be of no use to him; but this bell, that tells me of his affliction, digs out and applies that gold to me: if by this consideration of another’s danger I take mine own into contemplation, and so secure myself, by making my recourse to my God, who is our only security.

4 thoughts on “The Bell in the Woods”

  1. Lovely, heart felt post. I love the idea that you don’t know which will “appear” today — chaos, order, or cosmic — how like life that is! I love John Donne and this one is a very excellent one for our times, as you point out. I have asked that “Death Be Not Proud” be read at my funeral — another one, that I sincerely hope is “cosmic”, as you say. Have a day full of all that it means to be alive, Jane

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That’s amazing synchronicity with the campus bell and rediscovering your story! And it’s a lovely piece. It feels so empowering that the bell here is tolled by choice and in calm acceptance rather than being a fate imposed from outside.

    Liked by 1 person

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